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People and Environment

“We define health equity as the foundation of quality. We have mobilized across our organization to learn from our data and from the stories our people and our patients tell us as we recommit to dismantling racism within our walls and in the communities we serve. At Duke Health, we believe that racism is a public health issue, and it is going to take all of us to address it.” – Rhonda Brandon, chief HR officer and senior vice president at DUHS

   Stories about Team Members

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Read more stories on Inside Duke Health.

 

 

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Duke Health is all in for change

Duke Health Stands Against Racism" is a commitment to make lasting change and to create a community that is stronger, healthier and more just. Developed by a group of team members from across the organization over a period of many months, the one-page statement was a team effort across ​Duke Health entities — with DUHS, the PDC and the Schools of Medicine and Nursing all signing on.


Black History Month February

Black History Month Spotlight

Finding Unity one conversation at a time
​​​​​​​​​​​​Nakia Hester, financial analyst III with PRMO

Finding harmony in diversity
​​​​​​​​​​​​Moses Mugo, nurse manager of operations at the Duke Rehab Institute

Celebrating stories of Black excellence and triumph
​​​​​​​​​​​​Camille Grant Valentine, director of community affairs at Duke Raleigh Hospital


Kafui Dzirasa

Duke neuroscientist publishes anti-racism op-ed series

The moment has finally arrived for the United States biomedical research enterprise to directly confront structural racism in scientific funding, according to Duke neuroscientist Kafui Dzirasa, MD, PhD, K. Ranga Rama Krishnan Association Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

 


Angela Richard-Eaglin

Using cultural intelligence to live our values

The Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON) Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion wants all team members to exemplify the school's core values of excellence, integrity, collaboration, respect, innovation, diversity and inclusiveness. Therefore, the School is offering workshops for faculty and staff with the goal of teaching the foundational concepts of cultural intelligence.


Four individuals standing together with masks From left to right: Demi Tucker, Teresa Cates, Brittany Adams and Natalie Caro

Cross-functional team takes a stand for change

Meet the team behind the wearable ways to take a stand against racism and support our Duke Health values.

 

 

   Leaders Share their Experiences

* links are available with Duke Health login

Left from right, Frierson, Simmons, Spector, and Railey

Duke University, School of Medicine address systemic racism

In addition to Dean Klotman, speakers from across the School of Medicine shared their personal experiences dealing with racism: Assistant Dean, Graduate and Postdoctoral Diversity & Inclusion Johnna Frierson, PhD, fourth-year medical student Kristen Simmons, Associate Professor of Neurology Andrew Spector, MD, and Assistant Professor of Community and Family Medicine Kenyon Railey, MD.

Read more and watch the video here.


A. Eugene Washington, MD; Dexter Nolley, MEd, SPHR; Fabian Stone, MBA, MHA, MT(ASCP); and Brian Wofford, MBA, MHA, participated in the virtual conversation

DUHS leaders candidly share stories of racism and resilience

The virtual conversation “Black Men at Duke and in America" gave four Duke University Health System (DUHS) leaders a chance to reflect on race and personal and social transformation.

A. Eugene Washington, MD, chancellor for health affairs at Duke University and president and CEO of DUHS; Brian Wofford, MBA, MHA, vice president of heart operations for Durham County, Duke Heart; Dexter Nolley, MEd, SPHR, chief human resources officer at Duke Regional Hospital; and Fabian Stone, MBA, MHA, MT(ASCP), associate vice president of revenue cycle and health information management at DUHS, each shared their perspectives. The conversation was moderated by Rhonda Brandon, MS, chief human resources officer and senior vice president for DUHS.

Read more and watch the video here.


Adia Ross, MD, MHA; Jessica Johnson, MHA; Priscilla Ramseur, DNP, RN, CNOR, NEA-BC; and Katina Williams, MBA,​ participated in an honest discussion about racism and sexism.

DUHS leaders rise above racism, sexism

Duke Health's second virtual conversation about race featured four African American female leaders openly sharing their experiences with racism and sexism.

Rhonda Brandon, MS, chief human resources officer and senior vice president for the Duke University Health System (DUHS), moderated the discussion. Panelists included Adia Ross, MD, MHA, chief medical officer at Duke Regional Hospital; Jessica Johnson, MHA, administrative director of medical, surgical and critical care services at Duke University Hospital; Priscilla Ramseur, DNP, RN, CNOR, NEA-BC, chief nursing and patient care services officer at Duke Raleigh Hospital; and Katina Williams, MBA, assistant vice president for finance and divisional chief financial officer for ambulatory services at DUHS.

Read more and watch the video here.


Panelists in the hour-long discussion included Tracy Gosselin, Michael Spiritos, Katie Galbraith and Keith Stover.

Duke allies work to end racism, in justice

Acknowledging that being a silent supporter isn't an option anymore, four white Duke University Health System (DUHS) leaders spoke about what it means to be an ally to Black team members during a virtual discussion.

Participants included Katie Galbraith, MBA, FACHE, president of Duke Regional Hospital; Keith Stover, vice president for finance for the Patient Revenue Management Organization; Tracy Gosselin, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN, chief nursing officer for Duke University Hospital; and Michael Spiritos, MD, chief medical officer of Duke Raleigh Hospital. The conversation was moderated by Rhonda Brandon, MS, chief human resources officer and senior vice president for DUHS.

Read more and watch the video here.


​Clinicians Theresa Williamson, Kevin Thomas, Vicky Orto and Rick Shannon participated in the hour-long conversation.

Duke clinicians outline tactics for improving health equity

This hour-long conversation was moderated by Rhonda Brandon, MS, chief human resources officer and senior vice president for the Duke University Health System (DUHS). Joining Brandon were Theresa Williamson, MD, neurosurgery resident at DUHS; Kevin Thomas, MD, associate professor in the Department of Medicine and assistant dean for underrepresented faculty development in the Duke University School of Medicine; Vicky Orto, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, chief nurse and patient care services officer at Duke Regional Hospital; and Rick Shannon, MD, chief quality officer for Duke Health. This was the fourth in a series of candid conversations that began this summer on diversity, equity and inclusion at Duke.

Read more and watch the video here.


​Shelley Hwang, MD, MPH; Christopher Kim, MD, PharmD; Rebecca Lee; and Jonathan Bae, MD, CPPS, spoke during the panel discussion.

Seizing the moment to make meaningful change

Continuing Duke Health's commitment to having candid conversations about race, a panel discussion featuring Asian American and Pacific Islander team members took place on Thursday, May 13, 2021.

Shelley Hwang, MD, MPH, vice chair of surgery, Duke University School of Medicine; Christopher Kim, MD, PharmD, urology resident at Duke University Hospital; Rebecca Lee, SharePoint developer II, Duke Health Technology Solutions; and Jonathan Bae, MD, CPPS, associate chief medical officer for patient safety & clinical quality, Duke University Health System (DUHS), participated in the hour-long conversation. Moderated by Rhonda Brandon, MS, DUHS chief HR officer and senior vice president.

Read more and watch the video here.