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Duke’s Graduate Programs for Nursing and Medicine Rank Among Nation’s Best

Published March 16, 2020 | Updated March 17, 2020

Duke University School of Nursing
Trent Semans Building - Duke University School of Medicine
Duke University School of Nursing
Trent Semans Building - Duke University School of Medicine

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DURHAM, N.C. -- Graduate program rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report place Duke University School of Nursing and School of Medicine among the top in the nation.

The School of Nursing was again ranked the No. 2 program in the nation for its Master of Science of Nursing program (MSN) among 236 master’s programs ranked by the magazine.

Duke’s Doctor of Nursing Practice program (DNP) was ranked No. 4 among 170 doctoral programs rated annually by the magazine. Several nursing specialty areas were also included among the top 10: DNP-Leadership (first); MSN-Nurse Practitioner-Family (first); MSN-Nurse Practitioner-Adult/Gerontology, Acute Care (first); MSN-Administration (first); MSN-Nurse Practitioner: Pediatric, Primary Care (first); MSN-Nurse Practitioner-Adult/Gerontology Primary Care (second); Nurse Practitioner: Psychiatric Mental Health, across the Lifespan (second).

The School of Medicine was ranked among the best in the nation, placing 12th among 120 schools. Seven specialty programs in the School of Medicine ranked in the top 10: Surgery (fourth); Anesthesiology (fourth); Internal Medicine (fifth); Radiology (tied, fifth); Obstetrics and Gynecology (tied, fifth); Pediatrics (tied, ninth); and Psychiatry (tied, tenth). The medical school’s Physical Therapy program ranked No. 7 among 244 programs evaluated.

“Our schools of medicine and nursing are again ranked amongst the best in the nation, thanks to the extraordinary talent and commitment of our faculty, staff and trainees,” said A. Eugene Washington, M.D., chancellor for health affairs at Duke University and president and chief executive officer of the Duke University Health System. “Year after year, they have consistently pushed our patient care, research and education missions to higher levels of excellence and impact and for that, we are very proud.”

“We are very pleased with the School of Nursing once again being named #1 or #2 in seven MSN or DNP specialties, and near the very top in several other rankings, including the overall Best Graduate Nursing MSN and Best DNP Programs,” said Marion E. Broome, dean of Duke University School of Nursing. “These rankings are a reflection of our world-class students who are attracted by a world-class faculty and supported by outstanding staff. We are excited about the future of nursing education, research and clinical practice at the Duke University School of Nursing and will continue to build upon this wonderful recognition.”

 “Our stature as one of the nation’s preeminent medical schools is a direct reflection of our exceptional faculty, students and staff who consistently raise the bar for medical research, education and patient care,” said Mary E. Klotman, M.D., dean of Duke University School of Medicine. “I am especially proud of our departments, which consistently rank in the top among their peers each year, and of our Doctor of Physical Therapy program, which rose to number 7 in the rankings.” 

U.S. News annually ranks graduate schools in six disciplines, including business, law, medicine, nursing, engineering and education. The magazine uses criteria such as grade-point averages of incoming students, acceptance rates and employment outcomes of graduates. For medical schools, the magazine also weighs NIH funding, NIH funding per faculty member, medical school entrance scores and grade point averages, among other criteria.
 

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